AI and genetic cures of disease: where’s the evidence?

by Jon Rappoport April 22, 2019 (To join our email list, .) “Isn’t it wonderful? Disease is genetic, and we can alter gene function. We’re winning&;” Much trumpeting of genetic cures is on the propaganda agenda these days&;but where is the evidence? In order to rank as a cure, manipulation of DNA would have to heal a well-defined disease across the board, in a vast majority of cases. No such victories are occurring at present. But in order to raise huge money for continuing research, you don’t say, “Well, we hope the minor triumphs so far will expand in the future, so please write us a check for five hundred million dollars.” Instead, you tell lies, you exaggerate, you avoid stark facts. Reliable DNA cures are, right now, far beyond the reach of modern research. This means claiming the basic CAUSE of a given disease is gene-based is highly questionable, because the proof is in the pudding. If you can’t produce a real cure across the board, utilizing the purported DNA-cause, you can’t really claim you know the cause. Get it? “Well, we know what’s causing Disease X, it’s a particular gene, which we’ve isolated, but, ahem, we can’t cure Disease X.” No. That doesn’t fly. Then we have the so-called AI component. It goes this way; “In order to achieve genetic cures, we need to do an enormous amount of DNA sorting, which would take humans years and years. But with computers, we can accomplish the work in manageable time. This in itself is a miracle of modern science…” Yes, it might be, if, again, cures were really available, but they’re not. Therefore, the invocation of AI is piece of misdirection. All the propaganda focusing on genes rests on the pop-science notion, first floated decades ago, that the functioning of the human body is directed by genetic information, which contains complex commands. This, too, is an unproven assertion&;particularly the related idea that every disease is created by a single gene. That assumption hasn’t panned out. In this regard, the holy grail would consist of the ability to cure a grave disease which is obviously clustering in a given population because of environmental toxins. “You see, it doesn’t matter how much pollution our corporations cause. We can go in and change genetic programming, so humans are invulnerable to the poisons.” That is yet one more unproven assertion. It should be classified as a fairy tale until further notice. I’m not saying absolutely NOTHING useful has been learned from doing genetic research. I’m saying what has been learned has been massaged, exaggerated, and lied about, to a vast degree. I’ve described, above, the basic lies. We’re talking about pop culture notions and comic book characterizations being put in place, replacing sober truth. (To read about Jon&;s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, .) Jon Rappoport The author of three explosive collections, , , and , Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails .
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Jon Rappoport
by Jon Rappoport

April 22, 2019

(To join our email list, click here.)

“Isn’t it wonderful? Disease is genetic, and we can alter gene function. We’re winning…”

Much trumpeting of genetic cures is on the propaganda agenda these days—but where is the evidence?

In order to rank as a cure, manipulation of DNA would have to heal a well-defined disease across the board, in a vast majority of cases." data-share-imageurl="" style="position:fixed;top:0px;right:0px;">

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