environment

Cradle of Transformation: The Mediterranean and Climate Change

The Mediterranean is a cradle — of civilization, of agriculture, of history. But the region, stretching across southern and southeastern Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa, is also a crucible. Here, different cultures and religions, along with extravagant wealth and material poverty, have intertwined and often collided over the centuries. Today, despite millennia of resilience in the face of threats and tragedy, the region’s future seems uncertain as it faces a torrent of environmental change matched in few other places on the globe.

The Southwest’s Cities Are Booming. Here’s How to Make It Climate-Friendly

Phoenix is one of the country’s fastest-growing big cities, a sprawling metropolis in an increasingly arid region where federal water managers are currently proposing unprecedented cuts to water supplies from the Colorado River. At the same time, the cities in the Southwest, with their abundant solar energy capacity and potential for density, have a possible head start on various solutions to the climate crisis and resource shortages.  But only if development happens in the right way.

Dam Accounting: Taking Stock of Methane Emissions From Reservoirs

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

How Beef and Leather Supply Chains Pose Threat to South America’s Last Forest

They came from the forest. In early 2021, a settled Indigenous Ayoreo community living in the Gran Chaco region of Paraguay reportedly started hearing songs and shouting during the night. The singing came from an uncontacted Ayoreo tribe, who traveled close to the settlement to bring a message of struggle. From a distance, they sang of the vanishing forest they depend on and how much harder life was becoming for them. And then they left.

Oil Development Is Changing the Rules of the Game for Wildlife

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

Climate Crisis Forecasts a Fragile Future for Wildflowers and Pollinators

Think of climate change, and you’ll probably picture devastating floods, raging wildfires, or parched earth. For the environmentally savvy, coral bleaching or masses of refugees may also make it to the list. Not many of us would think of the vibrant wildflowers in nearby meadows as victims of climate change.

Despite EPA’s Partial Ban, Advocates Say More Action Is Needed on Asbestos

Anti-asbestos activists say the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) victory lap over their ban of one type of asbestos is premature and that legislation is needed to completely ban the harmful substance once and for all.    Earlier this week, the EPA moved to ban the ongoing use of the only known type of raw asbestos that is currently imported into the United States, nearly 50 years after the first regulation on asbestos products was implemented. 

California Grapples With Regulation of Known Carcinogen Ethylene Oxide

Late one warm Saturday morning in mid-March, a group of five longtime residents of Southeast Los Angeles gathered in a cramped office in Maywood to talk about living in one of the most heavily polluted areas in California.

Five Reasons to Love (and Protect) Freshwater Mussels

  This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

Once Extreme Ocean Temperatures Are the New Normal

This story by ">Krystal Vasquez originally appeared in EOS and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. 

SEC Climate Rule Would Force Companies to Disclose Emissions

Environmental advocacy groups are celebrating a proposal from the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that would require publicly traded companies to share with their investors the risks their companies face from climate change and their greenhouse gas emissions.

Rising Seas Threaten Communities in Ghana

This story by Erica Ayisi originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.    by on 4 March 2022

Chemical Spills — A Hidden Danger of Climate Change

When hurricanes batter cities or wildfires force people from their homes, there is often also the danger of a secondary catastrophe: chemicals from damaged facilities being unleashed on an already suffering population.  And, as a result of climate change, that risk keeps increasing for thousands of US facilities that make, use, or store hazardous materials, according to a new

Nebraska Agrochemical Contamination Throws Communities Into Turmoil

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. This is the second of a two-part series.

Activists Say New Railway Will Be Environmental Train Wreck

Citing grave dangers to human life and the environment, activists in two western states are suing the federal government to stop the construction of a new railway in northeastern Utah that would quadruple the area’s crude oil production and cut through a pristine forest wilderness. In addition to endangering the local population and nearby waterways, activists say the railway would also send the wrong message from an administration that has promised to take steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions. 

Is Agrochemical Contamination Killing Nebraska’s Children?

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

The Century-Old Renewable You’ve Never Heard Of

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

Damned If You Don’t: Vanishing Salmon and the Klamath River Dam Removal Project

For thousands of years, the Yurok have gathered along the Klamath River in northern California to honor the life-affirming runs of wild salmon. But these days their annual festivals have come to feel more like funerals than celebrations. There are so few salmon in these waters that the Yurok Tribe has had to resort to importing them from Alaska.   

Cargo, With a Side of Hornets, Flies, and Crabs

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

The Fear of the Fear of Death in ‘Don’t Look Up’

There are two kinds of people in America: those who believe that Adam McKay’s Don’t Look Up is real and is caused by human activities; and those who think the film is fabricated leftist fear-mongering, and that any movie that does (or does not) occur is just part of a natural cycle of filmmaking.  

An Indigenous Community in India Offers Lessons in Climate Resilience

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

The World’s Most Dangerous Headline

In September, the world was introduced to a threat so subtle, so insidious, that it had hurt almost no one.    It was the cassowaries. The big birds — flightless, — had come for us at last. They attacked us where we least expected them: in the media.  

You Do Need a Weatherman to Know Which Way the Wind Is Blowing

While the Biden administration has restored and boosted support for the National Weather Service because of climate change, the corporate bottom line is getting in the way of actually informing those at risk during increasingly common extreme weather events.

What a Future With Little to No Snow Means for the West

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

San Antonio Snoozing on ‘Lights Out’ Bird Campaign

This story by Greg Harman & Marisol Cortez originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

Do Green Energy Jobs Pay as Well as Fossil Fuel Work?

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.