environment

Young Plaintiffs Move to Block US Fossil Fuel Exploration

In a bold move, the young plaintiffs trying to force the US government to take action on climate change are petitioning the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to halt the development of new sources of fossil fuels. As they wait for a court date, they charge, climate change continues to jeopardize the planet. The 21 plaintiffs, ranging in age from 11 to 22, in Juliana v.

The Modest Start of a People’s Climate Rebellion?

Climate change is so impossibly, depressingly big, so out of control, that most of us feel powerless to do anything about it. Thus we turn away and do nothing. That’s human nature. Fortunately, there are people who are willing to step up and speak out for the tough choices that must be made…now.

Study Shows We’re Hurtling Toward a Climate-Related Health Crisis

Unless immediate action is taken, climate change–related food shortages will account for more than half a million adult deaths by 2050, predicted epidemiologist Andy Haines.

Trump Shutdown Compounds Threat to Public Safety and Protection

As the partial government shutdown lurches into its fourth week, there is a lot of collateral damage to go around, affecting everyone from communities waiting for cleanups of toxic Superfund sites, to new parents buying baby toys and even some victims of sexual assault.

Fighting Algae With Algae — A Problem Solving Itself

Here’s an interesting way in which a problem is helping to solve itself.Algal bloom — toxic plants that grow in water in hot weather — feed off of nutrients contained in runoff from farm fertilizers or town wastewater.

We All Have a Role to Play in What Will Be the Biggest Story of 2019

The recent UN report on climate change indicated that we could be facing existential risks — ever more extreme weather events and rising sea levels — within 20 years. So what is the world to do? Jeff Goodell, a contributing editor at Rolling Stone, joins Jeff Schechtman for this week’s WhoWhatWhy podcast.

Second Hand Smoke Causing a Western Smog Age

Seattle — best known for the Space Needle, the Seahawks, and Starbucks — has added a more dubious claim to fame this week: as one of the world’s cities. Canadian wildfire smoke is sweeping over the northern border, suffocating Puget Sound, Washington State, and beyond.

Washington State Judge Rules Against Kids in Climate Change Lawsuit

As wildfire smoke clouded the skies of Seattle, a Washington judge ruled Tuesday to dismiss a lawsuit against the State of Washington filed by a group of young climate change activists — who range in age from 8 to 18.

Watts: Another Flint?

The whole world knows the story of Flint by now. The famously depressed city in Michigan, where the majority of residents are African American, shifted its drinking-water source to a local river in 2014 in order to save money. Residents’ complaints about the terrible-smelling murky water that began spewing from their taps were largely ignored. As it turned out, they were being poisoned by lead contamination from years of industrial-waste dumping. Eventually, a state of emergency was declared.  

Will Pruitt Math Harm Your Air and Water?

Forget his use of a staffer to secure a used mattress, his taxpayer-funded secure phone booth, his insistence on flying first class, or his special rental deal with a lobbyist. Those scandals will go away when Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt is no longer in charge of the agency.

No Sh-t: Grassroots Activists Take on Big Ag — And Win

For years communities trying to fight pollution from factory farms kept running into a legal roadblock. Until recently, the courts ruled that these farms were from environmental regulations because their animal waste could be returned to the ground as fertilizer. No longer.

Will a Canadian Court Hand a Powerful Tool to the Oppressed?

Far away from the media spotlight, a crucial two-day hearing in a landmark court case could set the stage for giving stakeholders in developing nations a powerful tool to hold multinational corporations to account for violating labor and environmental standards. The case, , pits indigenous peoples of Ecuador against Chevron.

Trump White House Silences and Suppresses

And the winner of the 2018 Black Hole Award is … the Trump White House. Since 2011, the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) has yearly bestowed what it terms its “dishonor” on a government agency or institution that shows “outright contempt for the public’s right to know.” This is the first time a president and his administration have received the award.

Drowning in Plastic off The Bali Coast

When British diver Rich Horner plunged into the sea at Manta Point, an ocean-cleaning station near the Indonesian resort island of Bali, he was welcomed not by exotic wildlife but by a squirming mass of plastic. In a video shared Tuesday by leading UK papers, Horner documented his submarine sojourn amid a cluster of trash so dense it could have been mistaken for a seaweed colony.

Youths Suing US Gov’t on Climate Change to Get Day in Court

A three-judge panel in California unanimously ruled that the lawsuit of 21 young people, who want to force the government to take action on climate change, can proceed.“The question of the last few years has not been ‘do we have a case?’ but rather, ‘how far will the federal government go to prevent justice?’” said 21-year-old plaintiff Kiran Oommen. “We have seen that they are willing to go to many lengths to cover up their crimes and maintain the status quo, but not even the Trump administration can go far enough to escape the inevitable tide of social progress.

CEO Behind Murder of Environmental Activist Arrested

When masked gunmen killed renowned Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres in her home two years ago, many believed the murder was connected to her protests against the construction of a dam on a river sacred to an indigenous tribe.The arrest last week of Roberto David Castillo was a major break in the investigation of the crime. At the time of the murder, Castillo was the CEO of Desarrollos Energéticos SA (DESA), the construction company that initiated the dam project.Castillo was arrested at the airport as he attempted to leave the country.

2017 Was a Brutal Year for the Environment

As we humans are so busy abusing each other, the constant din of battle seems to drown out an even bigger one: over the survival of life on this planet. In 2017, Mother Nature took another beating. However, as people in Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida, and currently in California can attest, nature also hit back. The low point this year was probably the US’s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement and the systematic dismantling of the EPA. However, many other stories did not get nearly enough attention.

Plastic Ocean: From Thriving Ecosystem to Trash Dumpster

In the foreseeable future, the weight of plastic trash in the ocean will be greater than the weight of all fish.Already it’s been estimated by researchers that , and , contain traces of plastic.Every year about 300 million tons of plastic are pro

A Sad Countdown: Scientists Watch a Species Go Extinct

Conservationists in Mexico have front-row seats as yet another species is on the verge of extinction. They can watch, but it looks as though there is little they can do to prevent it.This time, the species in question is the vaquita porpoise. Experts believe there are only about 30 vaquita left in the warm waters of Mexico’s Gulf of California, the only area in the world where the small porpoises are known to live.Only discovered in 1958, the vaquita 一 known as the “panda of the sea” for the darkened rings around its eyes 一 has always been a rare and enigmatic creature.

Team Trump’s Hostility Toward Science Is No Hoax

A picture says more than a thousand words &; and sometimes it speaks volumes. That was the case when photographers captured Donald Trump looking at the sun without protective glasses during the recent solar eclipse. It pretty much sums up the president’s expressed dismissive attitude about science.

Inside the Chinese Meltdown Rocking Wall Street, Part 1

The Year of the Red Monkey, also known as the , starts next month in China. According to Chinese astrologers, the year will be a real rollercoaster ride, filled with surprise and mischief.

Paid Not to Drill? Not So Fast

Ecuadorian president Rafael Correa has worked very hard to cultivate an international public image as defender of the rainforest. But several local civil society and environmental organizations beg to differ.

Fracking plan for America - YouTube

More controversy this week surrounding the practice of fracking. The US Department of Agriculturehas dropped the plan to require an extensive environmental review before handing mortages to people that plan to use the land for oil and gas drilling. This has outraged opponents of hydraulic fracturing, who say it eases up rules on the drilling method. To talk more about this Greg Palast, an author and investigative journalist, joins RT's Liz Wahl.