environment

Do Green Energy Jobs Pay as Well as Fossil Fuel Work?

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

As the World Burns, Germany’s Boomers Have Final Say in ‘Climate Election’

Young Germans will be massing in the streets on Friday with Greta Thunberg in a global climate strike to demand action to secure their future — just two days ahead of federal elections on September 26. Fear is taking hold that temperature rises beyond the Paris target of 1.5 degrees Celsius seem inevitable or even acceptable to mainstream politicians and the older voters that elect them.    

Illegal Logging Reaches Amazon’s Untouched Core

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.  

What’s the Word? Climate Lingo Demystified

  The climate crisis is taking center stage, with deadly hurricanes, torrential rains, and wildfires blazing out of control, but it can be hard to grasp the jargon that accompanies a warming world. (“Carbon capture,” anyone?) In advance of November’s UN COP26 (see below), WhoWhatWhy has collected and clarified 14 of the terms you’re likely to see in coming months. 

Greenhouse Gases

Interview 1660 – New World Next Week with James Evan Pilato

[audio mp3="https://www.corbettreport.com/mp3/2021-09-16_James_Evan_Pilato.mp3"][/audio]This week on the New World Next Week: Africans denounce Gates and his Big Ag cronies for trying to speak for Africa; the UN calls for multilateralism with teeth as they problem-reaction-solution toward the New World Order; and comedian Jim Breuer joins a growing chorus of performers who refuse to perform for segregated audiences.

Capturing Carbon One Cooling Tower at a Time

  In mid-August, a cooling tower in San Leandro, CA, assumed a new and unusual role. Its original duty had been to remove excess heat from the pasteurization process at a creamery run by Alexandre Family Farms. Now, after a retrofit installed by the San Francisco tech startup Noya, the tower also captures carbon dioxide out of the air. 

Saving the Ozone Layer Prevented Even More Intense Global Warming

  This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.  

Engineer Pitches Cloud Brightening to Stem Arctic Melting

Stephen Salter was working on an eggbeater-shaped wind turbine in his machine shop in Edinburgh, Scotland, when he got a curious call. On the other end of the line was the cloud physicist John Latham with an unusual observation: If seawater were injected into stratocumulus clouds — the low-level, puffy, often gray ones that can look like cauliflower — to make them just 2 percent brighter, they would reflect enough sunlight to keep the Earth’s temperature from rising. Latham had christened the concept marine cloud brightening.  

Are There Limits to Growth? – Questions For Corbett #077

[audio mp3="https://www.corbettreport.com/mp3/qfc077-limitstogrowth.mp3"][/audio]Be afraid! Be very afraid! A "startling" "new" "scientific" report that "totally confirms" all of The Club of Rome's fearmongering over The Limits to Growth! . . . But does it really confirm what it's reported to confirm? And what are the limits to growth, anyway?

Facing Climate Change, Indonesia Still Wants Growth

This story by WhoWhatWhy apprentice reporter Tivara Tanudjaja is produced in partnership with , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

Can Blockchain Track Carbon Trading to Fight Climate Change?

If you find carbon offsets confusing, just wait. Some experts want to track trading in offsets by using another current buzzword: blockchain. Never fear; WhoWhatWhy is here to explain.  

Volcanoes Are Terrorists, and Should Be Treated as Such

Friends, it’s high time we look a threat square in the eye. It’s been hiding underfoot for years, endangering us all, just beneath the surface. Planning. Plotting. Percolating. Friends, I’m saying we need to acknowledge what the people of Pompeii knew: volcanoes are terrorism.    This is an uncomfortable truth to acknowledge, but it is necessary. Like terrorism, volcanoes lead to loss of life, property damage, and profound interference in the rhythm of our “normal” lives.   

In a Drier Future, What’s the Best Way to Secure Water?

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.  

Can Puget Sound’s Orcas and Salmon Survive Seattle’s Dams?

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

Rapid Growth in Arizona’s Suburbs Bets Against an Uncertain Water Supply

This story by ">Sarah Tory originally appeared in and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.  

For Carbon Capture, Invasive Trees Can Do More Harm Than Good

  This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

Better Building Codes Could Mitigate Climate Disasters

This story is part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   On the day Ruby Reid lost her home in Talent, OR, to the Almeda Fire in 2020, she got no official warning to evacuate — only her instinct told her she should.   “It was a really hot, windy, horrible day, and it was raining ash,” Reid remembered. “I’d already been packing up my stuff.”  

How to Solve the Climate and Biodiversity Crises Together

This story by originally appeared in and is republished here as part of , a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.   

Fracking and Health: Colorado Locals Aim to Clear the Air

In what has become an exhausting routine over the past several months, Sandra Duggan and her husband, Eric, readied their remarks, stated their names and address for the record, and delivered a plea to the Board of Trustees in Erie, CO, to protect their health from fracking sites so close to their home that vibrations knock framed pictures from the walls.     On May 11, the Duggans urged the board to approve the installation of air-monitoring equipment to track in real time what people in Erie, 25 miles north of Denver, breathe every day.  

Activists Storm the Boardrooms of Big Oil

The last week of May this year was a bad one for Big Oil. of Chevron’s shareholders voted in favor of a resolution calling for cutting back on the firm’s emissions. A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell PLC would have to cut certain types of emissions by 45 percent by 2030, a far greater amount than the company had set for itself.

600 Square Miles to Redemption

The idea first came to Bryan Stanley in 1999 during a fall excursion to Indian Lake County Park in Dane County, WI. As he looked over the gently rolling farmland on either side of County Highway K, Stanley told the driver that he wanted to create a national park in the state’s Driftless area in Crawford County, a couple of hours to the west.     “It just popped into my head,” Stanley wrote in one of a series of letters to a WhoWhatWhy reporter in the summer of 2020. “I did not realize that this project was going to take over my life.”   

Wall Street Is Thirsting for Your Water

In 1865, the final year of the American Civil War, a man named David Noble Smith started collecting water from a spring located near a peculiar rock formation resembling an arrowhead in California’s San Bernardino mountains. At the time, this was a few days’ horseback ride from a dusty and obscure place called Los Angeles. By drawing water from Strawberry Creek before any other white person, Smith staked a claim to owning the water, in the same way other white settlers seized rights to mine in the mountains or farm and ranch in the flatlands: simply by showing up.

Melting Himalayas Point to Problems Worldwide

Reading Time: 6 minutesThis story is part of, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.In April, mountaineers began tackling Everest for the first time since the pandemic began, but climate change in the Himalayas and other mountai

Environmentalists Score Big Wins Against Big Oil

Reading Time: 4 minutesBig Oil suffered major defeats Wednesday, as environmentalists pushed the fossil fuel industry to confront the human cost of high carbon emissions.In the Netherlands, activists won a landmark case against Royal Dutch Shell when a district court in The Hague ruled that the oil giant must reduce its carbon dioxide emissions much more quickly than

In a Pandemic, a Broken Food Chain Delivers More Hunger

Reading Time: 3 minutesConsumers are finding out the hard way what happens when the global food supply system breaks down.Shoppers panic over empty food shelves.

Could COVID-19 Lead to a Cleaner World?

Reading Time: 4 minutesThe widely published image of a clear and bright Beijing, China — a city otherwise often covered under a sooty fog — offers hope that there could be a silver lining to this devastating pandemic.

Trump’s Dirty Deed: Latest EPA Deregulation Will Kill Americans

Reading Time: 5 minutesIt is silent, deadly, and all around us. No, it’s not the coronavirus. It’s the dirty air millions of Americans are forced to breathe.

Scientist Is Saving Corals by Breeding Them in the Lab

Reading Time: 6 minutesWhoWhatWhy Climate Change CoverageJust off the coast of Singapore, a group of scientists huddles together in the warm ocean water as waves roll and crash around them. Clad in neoprene sui

Public’s Voice Needed, Even in a Pandemic

Reading Time: 4 minutesAs these words are being written, the clock is ticking on comment periods on a number of crucial proposals from the Trump administration — rule changes that could jeopardize public health and safety, and the environment. 

How to Get Climate Change Deniers on Board With Science

Reading Time: 6 minutesWhoWhatWhy Climate Change CoverageThe scientific consensus on climate change is nearly unanimous and freely available to anyone, and yet there are people who reject the idea that human activity is war